Film & Photo • Animation • Computer Animation

CINEMA IN 8 SEMESTERS

01 FRESHMAN

2-D
art101
4-D, COLOR
art103, 105
DRAW1
art106

WSTRN
arhi105

WRITE
eng101
02 FRESHMAN
ART352
CINMA
level 1


3-D
art102
DRAW2
art107

FINITE
mat104
RSRCH
eng102
01 SOPHOMORE
ART352
CINMA
level 1
ART352CINMA
level 2

PHOTO
art251

NON-WST
arhi207

GEN
ED
02 SOPHOMORE
ART352
CINMA
level 3
ART352
CINMA
elect
DSIGN
art258

GEN
ED
GEN
ED
01 JUNIOR
ART352CINMA
elect
2-D
elect
Loveland HallART
elect
 ART
HISTRY

GEN
ED
02 JUNIOR

3-D
elect
Loveland HallART
elect
Loveland HallART
elect

GEN
ED
GEN
ED
01 SENIOR
ART352
CINMA
level 4
Loveland HallART
elect
FREE
elect
ART
HISTRY

GEN
ED
02 SENIOR
ART352CINMA
level 4
Loveland HallART
elect
FREE
elect

FREE
elect
GEN
ED

21 hrs • Cinema • Film & Video

ART 249 • Computer Animation I

3 semester hours
This course introduces students to the many
areas and aspects of computer animation. Students’ model, surface, paint bump maps and displacement maps, light a CG environment, and learn to animate CG models, lights and cameras. Students are introduced to the group production environment. This course emphasizes the wide range of talents and disciplines within the CG animation field.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 267 or ART 268

Buster KeatonART 267 • Film & Video Production I3 semester hours
The emphasis of the course is on film and video as creative art media and the creative process as essential to analytical thinking and expression. The course examines historical and aesthetic approaches of the media based on twentieth century art. It offers individual experiences in film and video production.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 268Animation I • 3 semester hours
This introductory production course in basic animation techniques includes a historical overview related to current animation trends in education, industry, entertainment and independent/experimental production. It allows practical aesthetic and technical experiences in the fundamental principles and physics of motion. This class provides an analysis of action and basic physical laws through the study of movement and time. It serves as a foundation for all subsequent animation courses.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency. Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 367 • Film & Video Production II

3 semester hours
This course continues Film and Video Production I with increased emphasis on independent work and growth. It offers continued creative production experiences in interpretive lighting, dramatic composition, graphic design, creative editing, sculptural concerns, computer-generated imagery, and conceptual art. Students produce art work in film, video, and/or computer. Prerequisite: ART 267 (Film & Video Production I).

ART 370 • Film & Video Production III

3 semester hours
This course is a continuation of Film & Video Production I and II. This course emphasizes the importance of graphics, editing and motion graphic disciplines within cinematography. Students will work with post production techniques including special effects, sound recording, computer generated images and animation. Students will also begin thinking about promoting their work, and creating materials to sell themselves to future employers.  Prerequisite: ART 367 (Film & Video Production II).

ART 467 • Advanced Film & Video Production

repeat to total 6 semester hours
This course in professional film, video and computer art production emphasizes double-system shooting, traditional and computer-based editing, computer-based sound mixing, special effects, title work, computer imaging, and electronic cinematography. Students produce major projects with film, video, and computer.  Prerequisite: ART 367 (Film & Video Production III).

Cinema Elective (Choose One)

ART 348 • Computer Animation II
ART 349 • Computer Animation III
ART 353 • Animation II
ART 354 • Animation III
ART 400 • Advanced Compositing & Visual FX
ART 401 • Advanced Rigging & Dynamics
ART 402 • Storyboarding & Character Design
ART 403 • Alternative Processes in Animation
ART 404 • Advanced 3D Software
ART 405 • Advanced Flash Animation
ART 406 • Advanced Modeling & Texturing
ART 407 • Documentary Film
ART 411 • Experimental Film
ART 412 • Film Aesthetics
ART 414 • Lighting & Sound Design
ART 415 • Action Analysis for Animation
ART 462 • Computer Animation IV
ART 466 • Animation IV
ART 580 • Internship in Cinema

21 hrs • Cinema • Traditional Animation

ART 249 • Computer Animation I

3 semester hours
This course introduces students to the many
areas and aspects of computer animation. Students’ model, surface, paint bump maps and displacement maps, light a CG environment, and learn to animate CG models, lights and cameras. Students are introduced to the group production environment. This course emphasizes the wide range of talents and disciplines within the CG animation field.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 268 or ART 267

ART 268Animation I • 3 semester hours
This introductory production course in basic animation techniques includes a historical overview related to current animation trends in education, industry, entertainment and independent/experimental production. It allows practical aesthetic and technical experiences in the fundamental principles and physics of motion. This class provides an analysis of action and basic physical laws through the study of movement and time. It serves as a foundation for all subsequent animation courses.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency. Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 267 • Film & Video Production I • 3 semester hours
The emphasis of the course is on film and video as creative art media and the creative process as essential to analytical thinking and expression. The course examines historical and aesthetic approaches of the media based on twentieth century art. It offers individual experiences in film and video production.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 353 • Animation II

3 semester hours
This course is a continuation of Animation
I. It refines and develops the fundamental principles and physics of motion and applies them in context. Students will identify and resolve problems that arise in time-based media as a study of emotional expression.  This will provide a foundational knowledge of the fundamentals of acting and performance in animation. Prerequisites: ART 101 (2-D Design), ART 102 (3-D Design), ART 103 (4-D Design), ART 105 (Color), ART 107 (Drawing II) and ART 268 (Beginning Animation).

ART 354 • Animation III

3 semester hours
This course is a continuation of Animation I and II. It seeks to advance students’ knowledge in cinematic design and execution to better understand animation as applied to performance, emotion, and believability. Students will be encouraged to think of themselves as filmmakers through the understanding and appreciation of cinematic language and technique. The fundamentals of acting and performance in animation will be expanded upon and provided with an emotional context.  Prerequisite: ART 353 (Animation II)

ART 466 • Animation IV

repeat to total 6 semester hours
This course is a continuation of Animation I, II and III, and represents a culmination of our animation curricula. Students will be equipped with the skills and preparation to begin their professional careers in animation as well as the ability to produce thoughtful independent films. This course will challenge students to seek opportunities to explore a more philosophical and nonrepresentational approach, and encourage diverse career endeavors.  Prerequisite: ART 354 (Animation III)

Cinema Elective (Choose One)

ART 348 • Computer Animation II
ART 349 • Computer Animation III
ART 367 • Film & Video Production II
ART 370 • Film & Video Production III
ART 400 • Advanced Compositing & Visual FX
ART 401 • Advanced Rigging & Dynamics
ART 402 • Storyboarding & Character Design
ART 403 • Alternative Processes in Animation
ART 404 • Advanced 3D Software
ART 405 • Advanced Flash Animation
ART 406 • Advanced Modeling & Texturing
ART 407 • Documentary Film
ART 411 • Experimental Film
ART 412 • Film Aesthetics
ART 414 • Lighting & Sound Design
ART 415 • Action Analysis for Animation
ART 462 • Computer Animation IV
ART 467 • Advanced Film & Video Production
ART 580 • Internship in Cinema

21 hrs • Cinema • Computer Animation

ART 249 • Computer Animation I

3 semester hours
This course introduces students to the many
areas and aspects of computer animation. Students’ model, surface, paint bump maps and displacement maps, light a CG environment, and learn to animate CG models, lights and cameras. Students are introduced to the group production environment. This course emphasizes the wide range of talents and disciplines within the CG animation field.  This course is approved to fulfill the General Education designation of Computer Competency. Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 268 or ART 267

ART 268Animation I • 3 semester hours
This introductory production course in basic animation techniques includes a historical overview related to current animation trends in education, industry, entertainment and independent/experimental production. It allows practical aesthetic and technical experiences in the fundamental principles and physics of motion. This class provides an analysis of action and basic physical laws through the study of movement and time. It serves as a foundation for all subsequent animation courses.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency. Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 267 • Film & Video Production I • 3 semester hours
The emphasis of the course is on film and video as creative art media and the creative process as essential to analytical thinking and expression. The course examines historical and aesthetic approaches of the media based on twentieth century art. It offers individual experiences in film and video production.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 348 • Computer Animation II

3 semester hours
This course builds on the principles and knowledge gained in Computer Animation I. Students learn organic modeling techniques, basic rigging skills and intermediate compositing techniques. Students will continue to develop interpersonal communication and leadership skills while working in a group environment. Students will work on a short group film project and several individual modeling and animation project.  Prerequisite: ART 101 (2-D Design), ART 102 (3-D Design), ART 103 (4-D Design), ART 105 (Color), ART 107 (Drawing II) and ART 249 (Computer Animation I).

ART 353 • Animation II

3 semester hours
This course is a continuation of Animation
I. It refines and develops the fundamental principles and physics of motion and applies them in context. Students will identify and resolve problems that arise in time-based media as a study of emotional expression.  This will provide a foundational knowledge of the fundamentals of acting and performance in animation. Prerequisites: ART 101 (2-D Design), ART 102 (3-D Design), ART 103 (4-D Design), ART 105 (Color), ART 107 (Drawing II) and ART 268 (Beginning Animation).

 

ART 349 • Computer Animation III

3 semester hours
This course expands work in 3D computer modeling and animation. It introduces the use of bones and builds on previous rigging knowledge to include Sliders and other motion effectors and modifiers. Advanced surfacing and special effects work through group computer animation projects, and a detailed modeling project. Prerequisite: ART 348 (Computer Animation II) and ART 353 (Animation II).

ART 462 • Computer Animation IV

3 semester hours
This course expands work in 3D computer
modeling and animation. It continues working with sound, advanced nodal surfacing and special effects work through lectures and practical demonstrations. Students work on a group computer animation project, a detailed modeling project, complete a digital portfolio and give a software demonstration. Prerequisite: ART 349 (Computer Animation III).

Cinema Elective (Choose One)

ART 354 • Animation III
ART 367 • Film & Video Production II
ART 370 • Film & Video Production III
ART 400 • Advanced Compositing & Visual FX
ART 401 • Advanced Rigging & Dynamics
ART 402 • Storyboarding & Character Design
ART 403 • Alternative Processes in Animation
ART 404 • Advanced 3D Software
ART 405 • Advanced Flash Animation
ART 406 • Advanced Modeling & Texturing
ART 407 • Documentary Film
ART 411 • Experimental Film
ART 412 • Film Aesthetics
ART 414 • Lighting & Sound Design
ART 415 • Action Analysis for Animation
ART 466 • Animation IV
ART 467 • Advanced Film & Video Production
ART 580 • Internship in Cinema

Sophomore Candidacy

Overview

As sophomores, all Cinema students apply for candidacy after completing foundational coursework.

Film & Video students use this link to APPLY FOR CANDIDACY.  Animation students contact an Animation professor to apply.

The required portfolio constitutes an important early step toward career readiness. Contact a Cinema professor if you have questions. The wisest of students allow sufficient time to improve multiple submissions with faculty consultation and revision.

Candidate Information

Name

Email Address:  Provide your professional email handle - not your SCOTS student email.  Professional email addresses are frequently coordinated with web domain names (see below).  Access the Career Center's "Beginner's Guide to Professional Communication"

Phone number:  (XXX) XXX-XXXX.   Student ID (include @)

Download your unofficial transcript from SCOTS, save as a .pdf. A minimum GPA of 2.75 is expected of all applicants.

Professional Work - Digital Portfolio

Consistent colors, fonts, and design elements, memorably reinforce a filmmaker's identity. The successful film/video candidate thus communicates a unified personal brand by aesthetically coordinating the following items:

A link to your personal Vimeo site.  Vimeo is the preferred hosting platform for professional filmmakers. The best of sites organize projects into albums for ease of visitor navigation. Films hosted on Vimeo may be easily embedded into personal websites (below), forwarded to prospective employers, or appended to competitive applications for grants and festival entry. Vimeo is also launching a new tool to easily find and hire top-tier video professionals, so you want to update your profile and use it as a job search tool.

A professional website.

First, register a domain from a site like Domain.com, Bluehost, HostGator, or GoDaddy.  Securing a web address (like brianfuller.org, for example) is like buying a plot of land.  Next, build the house, with a service like Squarespace, Wix, Weebly, or WordPress.

Submit a link to the résumé page of your website.  An effective online résumé is interactive, featuring links to work and awards.  It should not be a .pdf or MS-Word document.

Submit a link to the gallery page of your website.  A gallery of completed projects, usually organized by genre (e.g., commercial, documentary, animation) or crew position (e.g., director, cinematographer, editor). For purposes of candidacy review, your gallery must include projects completed in ART267, Film and Video Production I, or ART103, 4D Design.

Submit a link to the demo reel page of your website.  A reel is a collection of your films' most impressive moments. As a sophomore applying for candidacy, your reel might be less than 20 seconds in length. As your coursework continues, develop a habit of saving impressive images from each class project for a combined running time of a minute in your final semester.

A business card design.  Your card should complement your website and feature a professional business email address. Students often find sites such as moo.com helpful in the design and printing of identity suite elements.

Three to six drawings from ART 101, 106 & 107. Of particular interest are images which demonstrate an articulation of depth and an understanding of composition.

Competencies & Qualifications

A link to your LINKEDIN Profile.  Your profile should include a professional headshot and a customized url (the default url ends in a string of random numbers).

An essay (500-750 words) which discusses (1) two goals you have for your remaining college projects and coursework, OR (2) two characteristics that make your work aesthetically distinctive. Because essays should be free of surface errors, please employ a reliable proofreader like GRAMMARLY.  It may be helpful to think of (and even to format) your essay as the letter of introduction you might send or e-mail a potential employer.

Career Development Meeting

A conversation with Career Coach for the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences might include the following topics: on-line job search resources; freelancing and the gig economy; relocation; guild and union membership; the path from entry-level to experienced career. Enter the date of your most recent meeting with the Career Coach.

E-MAIL Career Development Manager Christina Moreschi (pictured at left) or SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT through TartanEdge.

12 hrs • GenEd Skills

ENG 101 • College Writing Skills

3 semester hours
This competency-based course is a study of the organization and development of ideas in written composition, beginning with the paragraph and proceeding to the full-length paper. In this course, students develop the writing skills needed to prepare expository writing assignments, including college-level themes and essay examinations. Concurrently, students develop the reading competencies needed for a functional understanding of the texts and other resource materials used in this course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL010 or English Department placement.  Approved for General Education – Skills.

ENG 102 • Research Writing

ENGL102 - Research Writing3 semester hours
This course introduces students to the conventions of academic research writing. By practicing effective print and electronic research techniques; constructing accurate in-text and bibliographic citations; and employing document and formatting principles consistent with a discipline-specific citation style, students will produce research proposals, annotated bibliographies, and fully documented research papers relevant to their programs of study and/or academic interests. Prerequisite: ENGL101 or ENGL103.  Approved for General Education - Skills.

MATH 104 • Finite Math

3 semester hours
This course provides study and experience in mathematical representations, processing, problem solving and thinking. Students analyze and solve problems in areas such as set theory, mathematics of finance, probability, and statistics. Note: Students may not receive credit for both Finite Mathematics and Mathematical Reasoning I.  Approved for General Education - Skills.

ART 267 or ART 268

Le Voyage Dans La LuneART 267 • Film & Video Production I • 3 semester hours
The emphasis of the course is on film and video as creative art media and the creative process as essential to analytical thinking and expression. The course examines historical and aesthetic approaches of the media based on twentieth century art. It offers individual experiences in film and video production.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 268Animation I • 3 semester hours
This introductory production course in basic animation techniques includes a historical overview related to current animation trends in education, industry, entertainment and independent/experimental production. It allows practical aesthetic and technical experiences in the fundamental principles and physics of motion. This class provides an analysis of action and basic physical laws through the study of movement and time. It serves as a foundation for all subsequent animation courses.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

21 hrs • GenEd Core

03 hrs • Artistic Expression

ARHI105CINEMA FACULTY RECOMMENDS
ARHI 105 • Overview of Western Art History • 3 semester hours
This course is an introduction and general survey of art and artists from Pre-historic times through the 20th century. Students will examine major periods and styles which have contributed to Western art through the use of slides, videos, and films in coordination with the lectures.  Approved for General Education - Core 1.

03 hrs • World Civilizations

CINEMA FACULTY RECOMMENDS
ARHI 207 • Non-Western Art History • 3 semester hours
This course introduces students to artistic cultures outside of the western tradition: Islam, Sub-Saharan Africa, India, China, Japan, and Mesoamerica. Each culture will be examined with an emphasis on major works of architecture, sculpture, painting, and crafts. Important historic, religious, and intercultural developments will be examined, along with the strong artistic connections between some of these cultures.  Approved for General Education - Core 2.

03 hrs • American Civilizations

American CivilizationsStudying American ideas, traditions, and institutions, prepares students to understand and engage the issues that confront citizens of this hemisphere.  Choose one of many courses listed in the university CATALOG.

03 hrs • Human Behavior

Core • Human BehaviorWhat tools do humans use – physical, cognitive, and emotional – to adapt to their environments? While you may choose from many courses listed in the university CATALOG, the Cinema faculty recommends one the following:

COMM 100 • Human Communication
COMM 125 • Comm & Social Influence
JOUR 214 • Journalism & Society
CSD 125 • Psychology of Communication

03 hrs • Cultural Diversity

A student completing a course in Cultural Diversity and Social Pluralism will develop knowledge of diverse ways of living and thinking that are rooted in cultural, ethnic, racial, gender, and social differences.  Choose one of many courses listed in the university CATALOG.

03 hrs • Ethics

GenEd Core: EthicsExamine specific problems, issues, and choices, that confront individuals and society.  Critically deepen your own moral values for informed decision-making.  While you may choose from many courses listed in the university CATALOG, the Cinema faculty recommends one of the following:

HIST 105 • Holocaust on Film
JOUR 200 • Journalism Ethics
LIBR 106 • Information Ethics

03 hrs • Natural Science

Core: Natural ScienceStudents completing natural science courses with laboratory components will develop knowledge of science, and of the fundamental elements of the scientific processes in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics.  Choose one of many courses listed in the university CATALOG.

09 hrs • GenEd Distribution

03 hrs • Humanities & Fine Arts

ARHI354 • History of CinemaCINEMA FACULTY RECOMMENDS
ARHI 220 • Introduction to Film & Video Art • 3 semester hours
This course introduces film and video art as art media. Students will be provided with an historical overview from the beginning of film (c. 1895) and artists’ video (c. 1963) to the present. The course will focus on the approaches to technical and aesthetic elements that have contributed to transforming craft into art.  Approved for General Education – Distribution 1.

03 hrs • Social & Behavioral Sciences

GenEd • Human BehaviorUpper level courses build on previous General Education instruction to deepen written communication, information literacy, and global awareness, outside the major. While you may choose from many courses listed in the university CATALOG, the Cinema faculty recommends one of the following:

HIST 370 • The American Dream on Film
POLI 322 • Opinion & Propaganda
PSYCH 325 • Psychology of Creativity & the Arts

03 hrs • Natural Science & Mathematics

Distribution • Science & MathUpper level courses build on previous General Education instruction to deepen quantitative application of technology outside the major.  While you may choose from many courses listed in the university CATALOG, the Cinema faculty recommends one of the following:

PHYS 301 • The Nature of Sound
PHYS 302 • The Nature of Light & Color
PHYS 313 • Digital Electronics

21 hrs • Required Art

ART 101 • 2-D Design

3 semester hours
A course dealing with basic aspects of pictorial form. Two-Dimensional Design provides the student with a visual language for developing works of art. Problems challenge the student to deal imaginatively with the visual elements. Slides, books, and other aids are used to give the student historical information and offer insight into various problem-solving possibilities.

ART 102 • 3-D Design

3 semester hours
This course is planned to introduce the student to concepts and basic principles of designing in space and to develop his awareness of the problems and sensitivity to designing with materials.

ART 103 • 4-D Design

1.5 semester hours
This course introduces concepts and basic principles of designing in time and develops an awareness of time-based problems and a sensitivity to the tools of time-based media, including video editing software.  Co-requisite: ART 105 (Color).

ART 105 • Color

1.5 semester hours
This course presents students with a foundational overview of color for the visual artist. Basic color theory will be addressed, as will the applications of color across a variety of traditional and digital mediums.  Co-requisite: ART 103 (4-D Design).

ART 106 • Drawing I

3 semester hours
Students work mainly from the nude figure with primary emphasis on the development of perception. Fundamental areas stressed are figure proportion, composition, perspective, light, and shade.

ART 107 • Drawing II

3 semester hours
This course provides a continued introduction to basic drawing problems and principles with a broader exploration of media, process, and subject matter. Increased study of both historical and contemporary artists and images provide for further discussion of fundamental drawing issues. The creative uses of various media and tools, both traditional and digital, will be explored. Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I)

ART 251 • Intro to Photography

3 semester hours
Instruction familiarizes students with manual camera operation. Professional standards govern the exposure, editing, and printing of photographic images. Project-based instruction balances historical context, aesthetics, and technique. Course requires student access to a DSLR camera.

ART 267 • Film & Video Production I

The Great Train Robbery3 semester hours
The emphasis of the course is on film and video as creative art media and the creative process as essential to analytical thinking and expression. The course examines historical and aesthetic approaches of the media based on twentieth century art. It offers individual experiences in film and video production. Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite: ART 106 (Drawing I).

ART 258 • Graphic Design Software

3 semester hours
This course introduces industry standard graphic design software applications. It emphasizes word processing, digital illustration, image manipulation, and page layout. Projects stress the use of these programs as tools for learning the fundamentals and principles of design theory.  Approved for General Education - Computer Competency.  Prerequisite/Corequisite: ART 101 (2-D Design). 

06 hrs • Studio Art Electives

2-D (Choose One)

2-D Art StudioART 221 • Printmaking I • 3 semester hours
An introductory course designed to explore and practice the techniques, processes, methods, and materials in printmaking, covering lithography, intaglio, relief and/or screen printing at the discretion of the instructor. Images as an art expression will also be explored and studied.  Prerequisites: ART 106 (Drawing I) and ART 101 (2-D Design).

ART 331 • Painting I • 3 semester hours
A beginning course in the fundamental concepts and competencies of painting. Primary emphasis is on composition and the creation of form. Work with figure and natural objects, etc.  Prerequisites: ART 106 (Drawing I), ART 107 (Drawing II), and ART 101 (2-D Design).

3-D (Choose One)

3-D StudioART 211 • Metals I • 3 semester hours
This is an introductory course in designing and fabricating jewelry and metal objects. Students will develop personal, creative work through the exploration of various techniques that include soldering, sawing, cold joining, forming, forging and finishing. Criticism and analysis of metalwork will be learned through formal critiques and study of historical and contemporary works. Prerequisite: ART 102 (3-D Design).

ART 216 • Ceramics I • 3 semester hours
This course introduces ceramic hand-building and wheel-throwing techniques. Both creativity and craftsmanship will be addressed in each assignment. High-fire and low temperature glazing processes will be employed as students learn to load gas and electric kilns. Students study examples of historical and contemporary ceramic art as they learn to express aesthetic ideas in their own creative work.

ART 211 • Sculpture I • 3 semester hours
Exploration in three dimensional form through the use of various materials, methods, and approaches. Emphasis on individual initiative in both the development and the execution of sculptural problems. Prerequisite: ART 102 (3-D Design).

ART 236 • Wood Furniture I • 3 semester hours
This course introduces wood as a material to develop one’s personal creativity and three-dimensional design sensibility in regard to furniture. Methods of woodworking are investigated, including the use of hand tools, portable power equipment, stationary machinery, and modes of finishing. Consideration is given to the role of furniture and wooden objects historically, functionally, and conceptually. Students design and build projects with an emphasis on creativity, craftsmanship, and their ability to problem solve. Prerequisite: ART 102 (3-D Design).

12 hrs • Required Art History/Theory

ARHI 105 • Overview of Western Art History

ARHI1053 semester hours
This course is an introduction and general survey of art and artists from Prehistoric times through the 20th century. Students will examine major periods and styles which have contributed to Western art through the use of slides, videos, and films in coordination with the lectures.  Approved for General Education - Core 1.

≥300-level ARHI (Choose Three)

ARHI 323 • Art of the 20th Century
ARHI 324 • Art of the 19th Century
ARHI 331 • Baroque Art of the 17th Century
ARHI 332 • Art of the Renaissance
ARHI 333 • Art of the 18th Century
ARHI 341 • Classical Art
ARHI 342 • Art of Ancient Civilizations
ARHI 344 • Medieval Art
ARHI 423 • Art of the Far East
ARHI 440 • Art History Seminar
ARHI 525 • New Media in Art
ARHI 531 • Art and Society
ARHI 535 • Art in Revolution
ARHI 537 • Art of India
ARHI 540 • Experimental Film, The Visual Arts, and Contemporary Theory
ARHI 541 • History of Women in Art
ARHI 550 • Topics in American Art
ARHI 552 • Art of the Pharoahs
ARHI 556 • Early 20th Century Art
ARHI 557 • Late 20th Century Art
ARHI 558 • Contemporary Art
ARHI 560 • History of Photography
ARHI 571 • History of Western Sculpture

15 hrs • Art Electives

(Choose Five)

Art ElectivesAdditional courses in art nurture interdisciplinary study and creative expression across an expansive array of media. Choose five of the many courses listed in the university CATALOG.

Edinboro University is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design; instruction by our award-winning faculty meets the same rigorous standards as at the nation's finest art programs.

0-9 hrs • Free Electives

Variable

Free ElectivesCredits earned in free electives must be at or above the 300-level.

It's wise to take electives after satisfying required courses in Gen Ed and the major.

Transfer credits for which the school has no equivalent are frequently awarded credit as free electives.

Carefully chosen electives might combine to satisfy the requirements of an academic minor.